Timeline: Foul Among the Good

The Foul Among the Good is a phrase coined by Creek author Durango Mendoza to describe what children and their families will come across in some children's books. I use his phrase with permission to describe stereotypes of American Indians in children's books. Research studies show that stereotypical mascot images have a negative impact on Native children. Do a search on Indian mascots and you'll see similarities in them and the images in this Foul Among the Good gallery. Now consider this: Native children drop out of school at astonishing rates. Researchers cite a lack of engagement. Would you engage if you saw this sort of thing, year after year, in your classrooms?

The gallery is arranged chronically. Some of the images depict Native people in grotesque and savage ways; some depict Native people in romantic and noble ways. Some mock Native people in cartoonish ways, while others objectify Native people. Beneath each image is the title, author, illustrator, publisher, year of publication, and date it was added to the gallery. It is a work in progress. I welcome your assistance in building it. Please submit scans or photographs to me at dreese.nambe@gmail.com. If you wish, I will credit you with submitting the image. Uncredited images are ones I (Debbie Reese) scanned.


1658

Orbis Pictus (Visible World) by Johannes Amos Comenius
published in 1658
Date added to gallery: 6/2/2014


1839

Aventures de Robert-Robert et de son fidéle compagnon Toussaint Lavenette
by Louis Desnoyer, illustration by Frédéric de Courcy
Published in 1839 in Paris by Garnier Freres

1847

The Tales of Peter Parley, About America
published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co. in 1847
Date added to gallery: June 13, 2014 

1909

A Child's Garden of Versus
Written by Robert Louis Stevenson, illus by Charles Robinson
published by London J. Lane in 1909
Date added to gallery: June 9, 2016


1911

Two Little Savages by Ernest Thompson Seton
published by Grosset & Dunlap in 1911
Date added to gallery: June 13, 2014

1941

The Matchlock Gun by Walter D. Edmonds,
published by Dodd, Mead & Company in 1941.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013



A Child's Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson,
illustrations by Alice and Martin Provensen.
Published in 1951 by Golden Press.
Date added to gallery: 4/27/2016

1951

Bugs Bunny and the Indians,
published by Little Golden Books in 1951
Date added to gallery: 2/16/2015


1958

Danny and the Dinosaur, by Syd Hoff,
published by Harper in 1958.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013


1959

Color ABC, by Nancy Larrick, illustrated by Rene Martin,
published by Platt & Munk Co., Inc., in 1959.
Image courtesy of Nancy Tolson.
Date added to gallery: 2/21/2013.



1962

Alligators All Around by Maurice Sendak,
published by Harper & Row in 1962.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013


1964

Red Fox and His Canoe, written by Nathaniel Benchley,
illustrated by Arnold Lobel, published by Harper & Row in 1964.
Date added to gallery: 4/3/2015
Image courtesy of Leigh Woznick

1967

Clifford's Halloween, by Norman Bridwell,
published by Four Winds Press in 1967.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013

1970

The Nose Book, by Al Perkins,
published by Random House in 1970.
Date added to gallery: 2/12/2013
Image courtesy of Gina Boldman,
Eastern Michigan University

1973


Find Your ABC's, by Richard Scarry, 
published by Random House in 1973.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013

1973

George and Martha, Encore by James Marshall, 
published in 1973 by Houghton Mifflin.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013

1973

Please and Thank You, by Richard Scarry, 
published by Random House in 1973.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013

1974

The Stupids Step Out, by James Allard, illustrated by James Marshall,
published by Houghton Mifflin in 1974.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013

1978

The Stupids Have A Ball, by James Allard, illustrated by James Marshall,
published by Houghton Mifflin in 1978.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013

1978

Worse than Rotten, Ralph, by Jack Gantos, illustrated by Nicole Rubel
published by Houghton Mifflin in 1978.
Date added to gallery: 2/14/2013

1982

Berenstain Bears Go To Camp, by Stan Berenstain,
published by Random House in 1982.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013

1987

Where's Waldo by Martin Hanford
Published by Walker Books, 1987
Date added to gallery: May 29, 2014
Contributed by Sharon H. Chang

1991

Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman, illustrations by Caroline Binch,
published by Dial Books for Young Readers, in 1991.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013

1996

My Very First Mother Goose by Rosemary Wells,
published by Candlewick in 1996.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013

1999

Thanksgiving Day by Anne Rockwell, illustrations by Lizzy Rockwell,
published by HarperCollins in 1999.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013

2010

Alvin Ho: Allergic to Birthday Parties, Science Projects, and other Man-Made Catastrophes by Lenore Look, illustrated by LeUyen Pham, published by Schwartz & Wade Books in 2010.
Date added to gallery: 2/10/2013

2015

Winnie and Waldorf
Written and illustrated by Kati Hite,
published in 2015 by HarperCollins.
Date added to gallery: 4/3/2015

2015

Popcorn
Frank Asch
published in 1979 by Parents Magazine Press
 and in 2015 by Aladdin/Simon and Schuster
Date added to gallery: 7/24/2015

2016

Normal Norman
Tara Lazar, illus by S. britt
published in 2016 by Sterling Children's Books
Date added to gallery: 6/9/16

2016


The Wolves of Currumpaw
William Grill
published in 2016 by Flying Eye Books
Date added to gallery: 6/9/16

3 comments:

Elizabeth Gross said...

These are pretty unbelievable in their insensitivity.

Dana W. Reynolds said...

I need to be told how some of these are objectifying. Are native americans not to be mentioned in children's literature. Children pretend to be pilgrims and first Americans because they learn about them in early primary education - and that is where "Indians" are really being objectified.

Kanumommy said...

Wow....these are all so stereotypical. Still today? And people and animals playing " dress up" with sacred or important native regalia. Why are natives treated this way? What if I did a children's book where pigs were dressed up as Popes and Ayatollahs and the children were encouraged to role-play " African-Americans"! How would that go over? How hard is it to write a non-stereotypical book that gives actual information on specific tribes and trivializes no one? Either do a good educational job on every ethnicity or don't do it at all. There is enough garbage out there.