Monday, February 11, 2008

Recommended Materials: Boarding Schools for American Indians

As more resources and books are published on this topic, I will add them to this list. I highly recommend items listed here.

LITERATURE

Picture Books
  • Campbell, Nicola. Shi-shi-etko, Toronto: Groundwood Books, 2005
  • Campbell, Nicola. Shin-shin's Canoe, Toronto: Groundwood Books, 2008.
  • Santiago, Chiori. Home to Medicine Mountain, San Francisco, Calif: Children’s Book Press, 1998.

For Upper Elementary
  • LaFlesche, Francis. The Middle Five: Indian Schoolboys of the Omaha Tribe, University of Nebraska Press, 1978.
  • Loyie, Larry, and Constance Brissenden. As Long as the Rivers Flow: A Last Summer before Residential School, Toronto: Groundwood Books, 2003.
  • Sterling, Shirley. My Name Is Seepeetza, Groundwood Books, 1998.

Middle and/or High School
  • Qoyawayma, Polingaysi. No Turning Back: A Hopi Indian Woman’s Struggle to Live in Two Worlds, University of New Mexico Press, 1977
  • Tohe, Laura. No Parole Today, West End Press, 1999.

NON-FICTION, HIGH SCHOOL/COLLEGE

  • Adams, David Wallace. Education for Extinction: American Indians and the Boarding School Experience 1875-1928, University Press of Kansas, 1997
  • Archuleta, Margaret, Brenda J. Child, and K. Tsianina Lomawaima (Eds.) Away from Home: American Indian Boarding School Experiences, Heard Museum, 2000
  • Child, Brenda. Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940, University of Nebraska Press, 2000
  • Cobb, Amanda J. Listening to our Grandmothers' Stories: The Bloomfield Academy for Chickasaw Females, 1852-1949. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2000
  • Gilbert, Matthew Sakiestewa. Education Beyond the Mesas. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2010.
  • Johnson, Basil. Indian School Days, University of Oklahoma Press, 1995
  • Lomawaima, K. Tsianina. They Called It Prairie Light: The Story of Chilocco Indian School, University of Nebraska Press, 1995
  • Trafzer, Clifford E., Jean A. Keller, and Lorene Sisquoc. Boarding School Blues: Revisiting American Indian Educational Experiences, Bison Books, 2006.

WEBSITES


VIDEO

  • The Indian Boarding Schools: Keeping the Culture Alive, is a two-part series, prepared with the full participation of the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office. Go here to order the series and view the trailer.
  • In the White Man's Image, PBS, 1992
  • Shi-shi-etko, Moving Images Distribution, 2009.


8 comments:

Anonymous said...

The topic of boarding schools is very much alive in the discourse of social studies educators I have been listening to lately. Also, here is a Webquest on the subject, tailored for upper elementary and middle school students:
Boarding School Webquest

Boarding Schools said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

Good for Nothing by Michel Noel is also very good for teen readers. Noel is a Metis author from Quebec and the book is available in English and French. It's set after a young man (Nipishish) leaves residential school, but he continually references back to his experiences and their effect on his life and community.

It's set in Quebec Canada.

No Time to Say Goodbye by Sylvia Olsen with Rita Morris and Ann Sam is also awesome. It's set on the West coast of British Columbia - Kuper Island Residential school.

This is such a helpful site you've created.

B

Kaira said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Debbie Reese said...

The two "Comment deleted" comments were from a website about private boarding schools. The comments had nothing to do with American Indians or American Indian boarding schools. Someone from that site submitted comments here that were intended to draw readers to their site. I've deleted both of them.

Top boarding schools in India said...

All this may be subversive and impractical. However, it leads to the million dollar question- what kind of school do you want for your kids?

Anonymous said...

I would also recommend Fatty Legs: True Story by Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton; Liz Amini-Holmes, illus. and its sequel A Stranger at Home.

For older readers, the graphic novel Sugar Falls: A Residential School Story by David Alexander Robertson and Scott B. Henderson is also very powerful.

Thank you for your excellent site. As a relatively new educator and teacher librarian, it is a fabulous resource.

Jen Goerzen

Kinnikinnick Library said...

I would also recommend Fatty Legs: True Story by Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton; Liz Amini-Holmes, illus. and its sequel A Stranger at Home.

For older readers, the graphic novel Sugar Falls: A Residential School Story by David Alexander Robertson and Scott B. Henderson is also very powerful.

Thank you for your excellent site. As a relatively new educator and teacher librarian, it is a fabulous resource.

Jen Goerzen