Tuesday, July 07, 2015

Curious George and his... tomahawk

Over 2000 libraries have H. A. Rey's Curious George Learns the Alphabet on their shelves.  The book was first published in 1963 by Houghton Mifflin. Here's the bottom of the 't' page:

With that foot in the air, I think it is fair to say that George is doing what he (Rey, really) thinks is some kind of Indian dance. Regular readers of AICL know that I find this sort of play problematic because it immediately lapses into stereotyping.

As noted above, the book was first published in 1963. But, it has been published again and again... most recently (I think), in 2013, with a set of flashcards. That year (2013) was the 50th anniversary of the book, hence, a special 50th Anniversary edition. The local library doesn't have it. I wonder if the 't' page was revised? Do you have that version on your shelf? If yes, I hope you'll take a look and let me know.

Update: Thursday, July 9, 2015

A librarian at the Homewood Library sent me a photo of the 't' page. Here are the two pages, side-by-side:

In 1963, George was using that tomahawk and his tepee to play Indian. In 2013, we don't know how he is using it. He takes it with him outside. Readers are invited to fill in the gap as they imagine what George does with that tomahawk once he gets outside.

I'm glad the revisions were done. I would love to have access to the conversations that took place about the page and how it ought to be changed, and I'd love to know how children fill in that gap.

Here's some things that might cause a child to imagine George playing Indian with that tomahawk:

  • The child attended/attends a summer camp or event that invites kids to play at being Indian.
  • The child attended/attends a birthday parties where playing Indian is the theme.
  • The child goes to sports events where the mascot is meant to be an Indian.
  • The child chooses an Indian costume for Halloween.

What would your child, or the children in your library, imagine?

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Hi Debbie,

I recently bought the 70th Anniversary "Complete Adventures of Curious George". The page you feature is unchanged in the new edition. I'll be sure to have a conversation about stereotypes with my grandkids as I read this to them.

Thank you.

Kari B.