Friday, August 29, 2014

Books by Cherokee Mystery Writer, Sara Sue Hoklotubbe

Some months ago I was asked if I could recommend a Native mystery writer. Because my area of expertise is books for children and young adults (and not adult mysteries), I asked colleagues in Native literature for names and learned about Sara Sue Hoklotubbe.

Right away I downloaded an e-copy of Hoklotubbe's American Cafe. Published in 2011 by the University of Arizona Press, I liked it a lot and passed her name along. American Cafe is the second book featuring Sadie Walela, a Cherokee woman trying to find her way in the world.

Hoklotubbe's writing is the real deal. Her Cherokee identity and knowledge are the foundation of her books. As you read, you'll be drawn into Sadie's world. There's no romanticizing, no stereotyping, and no mis-steps either like those you'll find in books by Tony Hillerman or Sandi Ault. Their books make me cringe (and yes, I did read some of them.)

Hoklotubbe will be reading tomorrow in Washington DC at the National Book Festival. For the last few weeks, I've been recovering from a broken ankle. Among the books I've read is the first Sadie Walela book, Deception On All Accounts. I like Sadie and want to read more of her. I'll turn, next, to Sinking Suspicions. 

Though it isn't marketed to young adults, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend Hoklotubbe to older teens (or adults) looking for books--especially mysteries--by Native writers. I encourage you to get her books for your library and take a look at her website, too.  


Beverly Slapin said...

Another great read is a mystery series by Tom King (Cherokee), who wrote them under the pseudonym of "Hartley GoodWeather." The one I have is called "DreadfulWater Shows Up" (2002). The inside back jacket shows a photo of Tom, with his face partially concealed by his hand and a hat. It says, "Hartley GoodWeather is the pseudonym for a well-known Canadian writer who plans to make Thumps DreadfulWater the recurring hero of this entertaining new detective series."

Gabriele Bianchetti said...

@Bevertly Slapin
Really? I love Thomas King, and I'm glad there are several other books I didn't know about!